Saturday, October 22, 2016
Gateway to Sikhism

Baba Attar Singh at Hazoor Sahib

 Baba Attar Singh was in the army and posted at Kohat in the Artillery Regiment, where he remained for one year. 

 He remained a bachelor and refused to be married. He had a very great yearning to go to Hazur Sahib. So he left the regiment and started on foot for Hazur Sahib. From his childhood he had no attachment with worldly affairs and he remained thinking of Gurbani, naam, Gurus and Akal Purakh. 
He started on foot from Kohat, throughout meditating on Naam. His mind became ever fixed upon the shabad. He continued travelling on foot, day and night, in this way. Sometimes he would take some rest and would prepare his food after taking flour etc. from some Gurdwaras in the way. His mind continued to yearn to reach the sacred Gurdwara of Hazur Sahib and to rub the sacred dust of that place on his body. He would ​continously ​utter Wah​​eGuru.
In due course, Sant ji reached Abchal Nagar (Hazur Sahib). He at once entered the Gurdwara after necessary ablutions and bowed before the Satguru in most respectful way and obeyed the mandate. He had already surrendered his body, mind and riches and all that he possessed to the True Guru. 
Stayed at Nagina Ghat for one year and seven months 
Baba jee now began to stay at the Nagina Ghat near the River Godavari. After a few days he began to tie a small turban of khaddar on his head and put off all other clothes except the kacherra. He would keep a small towel with him. 
Continuous Meditation 
He now began constant meditation ie. worship of God and Naam. If some food was given, he would take it, otherwise he remained contented by sipping the water of river Godavari. He had given strict orders that only one parshada with some cooked pulses, placed on it, should be brought for him. This was complied with by his attendant. In this way, he stayed at Nagina Ghat for about one year and sevn months. During his stay at Nagina Ghat, he would spend nights in a small stone build hut where he would remain engaged in meditation. He would repeat the mool mantar accompanied by some more shabads. These countless recitations were unique in themselves. He wouldn't talk with anyone during this period. He was most humble and would fall at the feet of any Sikh who came to meet him. Even if someone uttered harsh words, he would remain silent. He would sweep the main Gurdwara Sahib (Darbar Sahib) with a broom and would bring water for its washing. 
True Stories 
One day Sant ji started walking on the bank of the Godavari. At a distance of nearly three miles he began meditation for nearly ten days without food. Bhai Nanu Singh, the head pujari/granthi of Darbar Sahib saw a vision one night and heard a voice say "Our dear Sikh is standing in meditation in the river for the last eight days without any food. Serve him food." 
Next morning, Bhai Nanu Singh cooked food and walked on the bank for about two miles but finding no one, returned back. On the same night he again heard a voice "You have not served food to our beloved Sikh." He replied, "Sir, I tried to contact him but could not find him anywhere." The voice answered, "Walk for three miles and then you will find him". 
On the following morning, he again took food and went for three miles on the bank of the river. Now he saw Sant ji standing in the knee deep water. When Sant ji opened his yes, he saw Bhai Nanu Singh and asked, "How have you come here?" 
Bhai Nanu Singh explained his dream and offered food to Sant Ji. He refused to eat anything. Bhai Nanu Singh then said, "I shall not be able to sleep. Kindly accept my humble offer" Then Sant ji warned Bhai Nanu Singh not to tell anyone of this episode and took some food. 
Cobra Came to Pay respects 
Once when Sant ji was in deep meditation at Gautam Ghat, the attendeant who brought food for him noticed a big cobra sitting near Sant ji with its hood fully spread. The attendant was horrified at first but when he neared Sant Ji, the cobra left the place. Sant ji opened his eyes and said, "This beloved being came to give it's darshan to me" 
Jumping in the River 
Sant ji in due course visted and paid homage at all the Gurdwaras near Hazur Sahib. He visted these on foot. Now nearly two years had passed in meditation at Hazur Sahib. He was extremely anxious to see the sight of the tenth Satguru but had not succeeded. One day, he decided to jump in the deep water of river Godavari so that his physical body should be sacrificed before the Satguru. He jupmed in but some mysterious power took him alive on the bank and said, "You are my Sikh. Be alert. You have to give Khande da Amrit to many persons in Punjab and other places. You have to spread the message of peace in the entire world with the help of Sat Naam." He also heard, "If you want to have my sight come at Nagina Ghat at midnight." Sant ji anxiously waited for that time. 
When he reached Nagina Ghat at the time, he saw the Tenth Satguru sitting on a throne surrounded by the punj pyaaray, chaar sahibzade and many others. Sant ji prostrated and paid all respects. As to what happened subsequently is not told to anyone by Sant ji. 
A few days after this, Sant ji Maharaj decided to return to Punjab. He offered respectful prayers for safe return. Bhai Nanu Singh offered, as a respectful gift, some clothes to Sant Ji but he refused to take these.
Acknowledgement: will strive to be most comprehensive directory of Historical Gurudwaras and Non Historical Gurudwaras around the world.

The etymology of the term 'gurdwara' is from the words 'Gur (ਗੁਰ)' (a reference to the Sikh Gurus) and 'Dwara (ਦੁਆਰਾ)' (gateway in Gurmukhi), together meaning 'the gateway through which the Guru could be reached'. Thereafter, all Sikh places of worship came to be known as gurdwaras. brings to you a unique and comprehensive approach to explore and experience the word of God. It has the Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji, Amrit Kirtan Gutka, Bhai Gurdaas Vaaran, Sri Dasam Granth Sahib and Kabit Bhai Gurdas . You can explore these scriptures page by page, by chapter index or search for a keyword. The Reference section includes Mahankosh, Guru Granth Kosh,and exegesis like Faridkot Teeka, Guru Granth Darpan and lot more.
Encyclopedias encapsulate accurate information in a given area of knowledge and have indispensable in an age which the volume and rapidity of social change are making inaccessible much that outside one's immediate domain of concentration.At the time when Sikhism is attracting world wide notice, an online reference work embracing all essential facets of this vibrant faithis a singular contribution to the world of knowledge.