Friday, September 30, 2016
Gateway to Sikhism

BHAI PREMA JI

Mai bin gur dėkhė nīd na āvai.
Without seeing my Guru, sleep does not come. ( Guru Granth sahib – ang 94)

There lived a devout Sikh named Prema in the village of Talwandi. He was lame, but yet able to walk with the aid of a crutch. He used every day to take a pitcher of milk to Sri Guru Amar Das Ji Maharaj, who drank some himself, and distributed the remainder among his guests. One day in the height of the rainy season, as the roads were full of mud, he set out with his usual offering.

The village chaudhri frequently observed him going and coming. On this particular day the chaudhri remained at home, and, having nothing better to do, watched the Sikh, and furtively took away his crutch, saying to him, 'Go not today ; there is too much mud on the ground. If you persist in going, you will fall down and die.'
Another man said to him, 'Your Guru is such a wonder-worker, why does he not cure your leg? If he cannot do so, how shall he save you hereafter? '

Prema prayed to be allowed to pay his usual visit to Sri Guru Amar Das Ji Maharaj. In reply to the impertinent inquiries he said he had not become a Sikh to have his leg made whole, and he had never asked the Guru for a new one. His tormentors continued to tease him for some time, and at last re­turned him his support. He quickly made his way to see his king, his beloved Guru Ji.

Guru AmarDas ji ( the knower of hearts) already knew what had happened and on seeing Prema ji asked Bhai Prema ji to go to the bank of the river where dwells a Muslim faqir called Husaini Shah. Go and tell him that the Guru has sent you.'

Husaini Shah lived alone and allowed no one to approach him, but by the Guru's favour he made Prema an exception, and allowed him to sit down beside him.

When Prema had finished his narrative, the faqir took up a stick to hit him, as he had done other visitors for intruding on his privacy. Prema watching his movements ran away, forgetting in his haste to take his crutch with him. To his delight and surprise his leg became whole.

Prema then returned to the faqir, fell to the ground before him, and thanked him profusely for the cure he had given him in such an unceremonious and extraordinary manner.

Husaini modestly disclaimed all credit, and said, ' Your leg was cured the moment the Guru told you to come to me ; but he has given me the evil reputation of exercising supernatural power. Go now, fall at his feet, and offer him my homage also. There are many servants of God like me, but I am confident there is none like the Guru who is perfect and omnipotent.'

h u kamee o u tham n eech hu kam l ikh dh u kh sukh p aaee ah i ||
By His Command, some are high and some are low; by His Written Command, pain and pleasure are obtained.

e i kanaa h u kam ee bakhasee s eik h u kamee sadh aa bhav aaeeahi ||
Some, by His Command, are blessed and forgiven; others, by His Command, wander aimlessly forever.

h u kamai a(n)dhar sabh k o b aahar hu kam n koe || n aa nak hu kamai j ae bu jh ai th ho u mai keh ai n k oe ||2|| Everyone is subject to His Command; no one is beyond His Command.
O Nanak, one who understands His Command, does not speak in ego. ||2||
- Japji Sahib

Acknowledgement: http://tuhitu.blogspot.com/

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The etymology of the term 'gurdwara' is from the words 'Gur (ਗੁਰ)' (a reference to the Sikh Gurus) and 'Dwara (ਦੁਆਰਾ)' (gateway in Gurmukhi), together meaning 'the gateway through which the Guru could be reached'. Thereafter, all Sikh places of worship came to be known as gurdwaras.
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