Sunday, December 04, 2016
Gateway to Sikhism

Sakhi : I need a head !

Khalsa mero roop hai khaas. Khalsay may hau karo nivaas
à Khalsa is my form and shape In the Khalsa I reside in spirit
( Guru Gobind Singh ji in Sarb Loh Granth)

The day dawned clear and bright for the Baisakhi celebration of 1699. The Sikhs were in a festive mood because Guru Gobind Rai had proclaimed that all should come together at Anandpur Sahib. A small tent was pitched on a small hill now called Kesgarh Sahib at Anandpur and an open air dewan(assembly) was held.

The sangat gathered in anticipation in front of the Guru's tent. They expected to hear a stirring speech. No one was prepared for the sight of the Guru when he did appear from a tent after Asa Ki Waar. Guru ji was dressed in his royal blue uniform with his arms girded about him; his eyes were so intense that no one dared to look at him. He drew his sword and shouted, " I need a head!" "Today I need the head of a Sikh. Is there a Gursikh who loves the Guru and who follows the Guru's command, who will give me their head? There was much commotion, normally the Guru gives blessings and happiness and now people could not believe their ears. The Guru wanted to kill one of his beloved Sikhs? Again the cry rang out, and again. Many people ran away in fear and horror. But then one Gursikh, Daya Ram, rose and said, "O beloved Guru, my head has always been yours."
The Guru took him into the tent and came out with a sword dripping with blood.
[Guru Sahib took Daya Ram into the tent and only Bhai Daya Ram and Guru Sahib know what happened inside the tent .Guru Ji nor Daya Ram ever told anyone what happened inside the tent. All that we know is that, when Guru Sahib came out of the tent his Kirpan was dripping with blood. Guru Ji did not want to tell anyone what he did, so what right do we have to make guesses as to what might have happened. In doing so the teaching of the Guru is left behind and arguments continue. ]

Again he asked for a head. Dharm Das came up and said, "Take my head, O dear one." Once again, the Guru took him into his tent and emerged with a dripping sword. For the third time, he asked the question. Mokum Chand bowed before his Master. The Sikhs began to think that the Guru had lost all reason and went to his mother to complain. Two more times the call went out, and two more devoted Sikhs, Himmat and Sahib Chand, stepped forward to fill the void. The Guru then went into the tent himself.

Suddenly, the Guru and the five appeared. He had dressed them and himself in beautiful golden clothes so that they shone like the sun. To them he said, "You and I are one and the same." The gathering cheered the five for their courage. The Guru then said, "From this day on the Khalsa, the Pure Ones, will be baptized by Khande dee Pahul (Amrit). They shall become Singhs and Kaurs."

The Guru began stirring water in a bowl with his Khanda while reciting Gurbani. Sugar crystals called 'Patasas' were mixed in the water by Mata Sahib Kaur so that those who drank it would be both strong and kind. The Guru honored her by making her the Mother of the Khalsa.

The Guru gave the Amrit to the five in much the same manner as it is given today. He laid down the rehit: to wear the five K's, help the poor, be faithful to one's spouse, work by honest labor, keep a healthy body, keep long hair, and rise early and praise God's Name. When he had given them the Amrit, he asked them to give it to him. They were amazed at this request. The Guru said, "The Khalsa is the Guru, and the Guru is the Khalsa. There is no difference between you and me. " They then baptized Guru ji. He gave them the appellation of SINGHS or lions and they were named from Daya Ram to Daya Singh, Dharam Das to Dharam Singh, Mohkam Chand to Mohkam Singh, Himmat Chand to Himmat Singh, and Sahib Chand to Sahib Singh. He called the five Sikhs his "Panj Piare", or five beloved ones, and thus Guru Gobind Rai became Guru Gobind Singh.

Baisakhi we were thousands, but only five had the courage for dying.
Then one brave man, one flashing sword, turned us all to lions.
And now we live His Legacy, to die before we fall.
And like the five who answered the call, we can't turn back at all.

Stand as the Khalsa, strong as steel, steady as stone.
Give our lives to God and Guru, mind and soul, breath and bone. – ( from : Song of the Khalsa)

Acknowledgement: http://tuhitu.blogspot.com/

WorldGurudwaras.com
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The etymology of the term 'gurdwara' is from the words 'Gur (ਗੁਰ)' (a reference to the Sikh Gurus) and 'Dwara (ਦੁਆਰਾ)' (gateway in Gurmukhi), together meaning 'the gateway through which the Guru could be reached'. Thereafter, all Sikh places of worship came to be known as gurdwaras.
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Encyclopedias encapsulate accurate information in a given area of knowledge and have indispensable in an age which the volume and rapidity of social change are making inaccessible much that outside one's immediate domain of concentration.At the time when Sikhism is attracting world wide notice, an online reference work embracing all essential facets of this vibrant faithis a singular contribution to the world of knowledge.
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