Sunday, September 25, 2016
Gateway to Sikhism

 

Gurudwara Mal ji Sahib

Gurudwara Mal ji Sahib is also near the railway station but closer to town. Mal (also called jal and van) is a shady tree. It is said that once as Rai Bular was riding among the fields in this area, he saw young Nanak sleeping in the shade of a mal tree. What struck Rai Bular was that the shade had not moved away from the sleeper as the movement and position of the Sun warranted. According to another version, the shade had moved away from the Guru but a large cobra had spread its huge hood over his face so that his sleep was not interrupted. This miracle and the incident related to Kiara Sahib convinced Rai Bular of the spiritual eminence of Guru Nanak Dev whose devotee he became.
 This Gurudwara, too, was first built by Diwan Kaura Mal and renovated by Maharaja Ranjit Singh. It is larger and more imposing than Kiara Sahib with its broad copings mounted with domelets around the central dome, domed kiosks at the corners of the roof and porches on the sides of the hall.This place is presently situated amidst the thick population of Nanakana Sahib. After partition, unfortunately, Sri Guru Granth Sahib has not been ceremoniously opened. Anyhow a portrait of the Guru is placed at the sanctum sanctorum, where the pilgrims pay a visit.This holy place is associated with the childhood activities of Guru Nanak Dev ji. One day while grazing the cattle, the Guru was taking rest under a shady tree. He went into trance. When the shadows were falling down, his divinely face happened to be covered with the sunshine. A big cobra spread its hood on the very face of the Guru for relieving him from the scorching heat. Rai Bular, the hakam of Talwandi saw this from a far off place. He got the impression that the child Guru Nanak was bitten by the snake. On approaching the the place, where the Guru Nanak was lying, the snake snailed to its pit. The Guru was awakened by the Rai Bular and he found him quite safe and sound. The Rai Bular, thus came to realise the divine personality of the Guru and became his disciple from that very day. He made it clear to Mehta Kalu that he should not take the former as merely his son but a revered holy prophet. A grant building stands erected to day at this historical site.
This place is presently situated amidst the thick population of Nankana Sahib. After partition, unfortunately, Sri Guru Granth Sahib has not been ceremoniously opened anyhow a portrait of the Guru is placed at the sanctorum, where the pilgrims pay a visit. A vana tree immortalises the historical place.

Acknowledgements:

Text and photographs: Gurdwara Gurdham at Pakistan, written by Roop Singh and Published by SGPC
Photographs : Kanwer Sosheel Singh  from Pakistan
Photographs: S. Rajinder Singh Narang

 

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The etymology of the term 'gurdwara' is from the words 'Gur (ਗੁਰ)' (a reference to the Sikh Gurus) and 'Dwara (ਦੁਆਰਾ)' (gateway in Gurmukhi), together meaning 'the gateway through which the Guru could be reached'. Thereafter, all Sikh places of worship came to be known as gurdwaras.
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