Thursday, September 29, 2016
Gateway to Sikhism

 

29th November

 

1631 Sant Sipahi Baba Budha Ji passed away in Ramdas at the age 125. Guru Hargobind personally conducted the last rights. Subsequently, his son Bhai Bhana Ji was made the head Granthi of Sri Harmandir Sahib.

-Ref. "Amritsar Ji Dae Darshan Eshnan Utay 500 Sala Di Ethasak Directory," Satnam Singh Khalsa Advocate, pp. 69.

==> BABA BUDHA JI: born on 7 katak sanmat 1563 at Kathunangal (Dist. Amritsar) to father Sudhae and mother Gora. Parents named the child as Budda. In sanmat 1574, Guru Nanak Dev Ji visited Kathunangal village. While grazing cattle, Budda met Guru Nanak and served milk in sewa. During their conversation, Guru Nanak declared that though young in age, he was "Budha" in terms of understanding and wisdom. Since then he came to known as Budha.

Budha adopted Sikh faith and lived an exemplary GurSikh living. As a result he came to respectfully known as "Baba Budha" and righteously earned some of the highest Gurughar honors. In sanmat 1661, he was bestowed the honor of being the first Granthi (head priest) of the holy Harminder Sahib after installation of the holy Guru Granth Sahib there for the first time. He had the privilege to serve, enjoy the company, and receive blessing of first six Gurus. Guru Har Gobind Sahib learned gurmukhi from Baba Budha. Since Guru Angad Dev Ji period and until Guru Har Gobind Sahib, Baba Budha was responsible for tilak during the gur gadhi ceremonies.

Finally on 18 Maghar Sanmat 1688, Baba Budha Ji passed away in village Ramdas (Dist. Amritsar). Guru Har Gobind personally conducted the cremation and last rituals. At the place of cremation, a beautiful Mandir named "SachKhand", was established.

Since Sujan Singh Ji did not have any children, Baba Budha's Gadhi came under the control of Udasi Pracharaks, which is as follows:

Charandas,
Brahamprakas
Ramprasaad
Thajurdas
Raghudas, who became Raghubir Singh after partaking Amrit. Raghubir Singh was the last Mahant after whom the control was passed onto the Shiromani Gurudwara Prabandak Committee.

Present generations from Baba Buddha's brothers still flourish in Badhae Ramdaspurae.

1737 Bhai Mani Singh, a great scholar among the Sikhs, was martyred. He started a school of exposition of holy Guru Granth Sahib. He was second famous head priest of Sri Harmandir Sahib, after Baba Buddha Ji.
1885 Baba Ram Singh Namdhari passed away after 13 years of solitary confinement while in exile at Rangun, Burma.

==> BABA RAM SINGH was born on 5th Magh sunmat 1872 in village Rayia, Ludhiana, to father Jassa Singh and mother Sedha Kaur. Since early childhood, Ram Singh was inclined to reciting God's name (Vaaheguru's Naam simran). For a while, he served in the forces of Lahore darbar. However in 1841 he left active service and joined the company of Baba Balak Singh, whose preachings had enlightened thousands. Upon receiving Naam Updaesh, Ram Singh settled in Bhaenni village and engaged in extensive preaching of Sikh faith. On the Baisakhi day of 1857, Baba Ram SIngh administered "Pahul" to teh Sikhs in his village and created 22 centres in different parts of the country. He started the "Kuka" branch. Kuka Sikhs wear white attire and a malla made from white wool. Their practices include, giving Vaaheguru Gurmantar in individual's ear; amrit is not partaken together, rather given to individuals in isolation; practice of "Hawaan" ceremony; rather than the traditional Parikarma around Guru Granth Sahib during marriage ceremony, they recite lawan in presence of fire (Agni Haum). During religious ceremonies, they yell, shout, and dance out of love. The punjabi term for their yelling and shouting is "Kukeh". Hence they are popularly known as "Kukas".

When the British government were alluring unemployed Sikh youths into their armed forces, Baba Ram Singh was among many GurSikhs who considered it inappropraite to serve a foreign government. He initiated a non-cooperation movement at times when Congress wasn't even born. It is because of their principles that the Namdari movement came in direct conflict with the British government.

In 1871, the Kukas held a conference at Khote. Some recalcitrant Kuka leaders, despite Baba Ram Singh's exhortation, attacked the butchers at Amritsar on June 14, 1871 and at Raikot on 15th July, 1871. Baba Ram Singh was held responsible for this outrage and his movements were restricted. But the Kuka intransigancy could not be stemmed. Again some zealots attacked Malerkotla on January 15, 1872 and killed Kotwal Ahmedkhan and 7 sepoys. 68 Kukas were captured near the village Rar. 42 of whome were blown up with guns on January 17 under the orders of M.L. Cowan, Deputy Commissioner of Ludhiana, while on eboy was slaughtered to pieces. Next day the remaining 16 were blown up under the orders of T.D. Forsy, the Commissioner, Ambala Division. Only 2 Kuka women were spared. Namdhari's successfully evoked a rebellion within a Army center. As a result 95 Namdhari Sikhs were court marshaled. In 1872 a British armoury was looted and several weapons were taken away. As a result, Baba Ram Singh and 12 of his associates were exiled to Rangun, Burma. Baba Ram Singh died there after 13 years of solitary confinement, on Nov. 29th, 1885.

Baba Ram Singh married Mai Jassah of Village Tharodh in Ludhiana district and had two daughters. As a result, Baba Ram Singh's gaddhi was assumed by his younger brother Bhai Budh Singh Ji. Later Bhai Pratap Singh, son of Bhai Budh Singh assumed this gaddhi and continued to serve the followers and visitors with langer and Akhand Kirtan.

-Ref. Mahan Kosh (pp. 1033-1034) Naraen Singh, "Kau Kito Visahau?" Singh Brothers, Mai Sewa, Amritsar, ISBN 81-7205-003-8, 1986, 1990, 1992

1955 Sardar Pratap Singh's accepted shahadat in Loon (Salt) Mandi, in connection with Punjabi Suba morcha.
1961 Master Tara Singh, along with Sant Fateh Singh and 8 members of Akali Dal Working Committee were tried for breaking the solemn vow taken before the Akal Takhat. Both Master Tara Singh and Sant Fateh Singh sperarately had taken vow before the Akal Takhat for fasting unto death for achieving Punjabi Speaking State but had broken the fast without achieving the objective on sheer assurances.

Five priests headed by Jathedar Achhar Singh of the Akal Takhat punished Master Tara Singh to recite more prayers besides his daily routine prayers and to perform one Akhand Path. He was also to clean utensils and shoes of the congregation in any Gurdwara for 5 days and offer Karah Parshad of Rs. 125 at the end of his punishment. Other leaders were also similarly punished in proportion to their guilt which all of them accepted.

-Source. "History of Sikh Struggles, Vol. 1," By Gurmit Singh, Atlantic Publishers & Distributors, 1989. pp. 27

1981 A bomb explodes at Chowk Mehta, the headquarters of Jarnail Singh Bhindranwala. Three Sikhs were killed. Jarnail Singh alleged that the bomb had been thrown by some of the members of the Nirankaris. In spite of three deaths, the police took absolutely no action.

-Ref. THE SIKHS' STRUGGLE FOR SOVEREIGNTY, An Historical Perspective By Dr. Harjinder Singh Dilgeer and Dr. Awatar Singh Sekhon Edited By: A.T. Kerr Page 110-119

1983 Constitution of Khalistan released by Dr. Harjinder Singh Dilgeer in London.
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