Thursday, October 19, 2017
Gateway to Sikhism

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Guru Arjan:"Truth is the highest of all Virtues; but higher still is the living of Truth."
Based on the belief in One God, the Sikh religion recognizes the equality of all human beings, and is marked by rejection of idolatry, ritualism, caste and asceticism. This website serves to heighten the awareness of Sikhism and hopefully can be of some use to seekers of knowledge.

Q61. What is the role of service (Sewa) without thoughts of self in Sikhism?

The Gurus mentioned the performance of selfless service on the part of a disciple as the first step in Sikhism. By doing service of various kinds without payment or any expectation of reward, one acts as a Sewak, or Sewadar. From this may spring humility and the consequent elimination of one's ego in this way, God's "Name" can best enter an humbled mind.

What are the requirements of a true Sewak? He should have an absolute faith in the Guru; he must surrender himself to follow the code of self-discipline as laid down by the Gurus. Voluntary service can be of different kinds - with body, mind and money. First comes the physical service - shoe-care at the temple, the cleaning of the premises, cooking and serving in the Free Kitchen. Apart from serving Sangat(Congregation) one is also expected to serve one's family members, relations and the community. One may help in cash or kind, to deserving persons and charitable organisations. Then comes service with the mind, such as is required for reflection on Gurbani and the remembrance of God's Name - All these forms of service are recommended by the Gurus.

They also warn us that service must be done gladly and without any motive for compensation. It has not be done with a secret or hidden ideas to win approbation, honour or position. These defeat the main object of "service" which is to eliminate the ego. Unfortunately, most Sikhs do little sewa, but expect a big return for what they do such considerations are unbecoming for True Disciples.

The Gurus have enumerated various benefits from doing selfless service. One may obtain inner happiness and real honor. As one learns to be humble and associates with holy person, and progresses on the spiritual path, so one may come to worldly success. Sikhism, requires a Sadhana - an effort towards the spiritualising of the self.
All the Gurus performed various kinds of voluntary service, both inside and outside Sikh institutions. The Sikhs then followed in their foot-steps; we have examples of the services of Bhai Manjh, Bhai Hindal and Bhai Kanhaiya, to name but a few. Even today, we find various kinds of service organisations run by the Sikhs in India, like orphanages, widows' homes, institutes for the destitute and the handicapped, like the Blind school.

The important question to ask oneself is: "What service can I do?" The answer depends on one's own abilities and inclination. One may serve in any field in which one is interested. Any service, is a step on the path of Sikhism, provided it is done in sincerity and without thoughts of the self.

 

iWitness Living a Carnage 1984

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SikhSiyasat.Net Sikhs Experiencing Institutional Racism, Concludes Sikh Federation UKSikhSiyasat.NetLondon: Labour MP for Birmingham Edgbaston Preet Kaur Gill here on Tuesday and Chair of the All Party Parliamentary Group for UK Sikhs challenged Amb...
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The Indian Express RSS affiliate Rashhtariya Sikh Sangat says false propaganda unleashed against itTimes of IndiaJALANDHAR: Some Sikh groups and leaders are trying to create a controversy about a function being organized by Rashtariya Sikh Sangat at...
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Coventry Telegraph Sikh community shares free food as part of International Langar WeekCoventry TelegraphOrganised by the Sikh Press Association, Langar Week took place from October 2 to 9 with the aim of encouraging more people to use the free food...
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Times of India CBI thinks Sikh radicals behind killings in PunjabTimes of IndiaA controversial Sikh leader in Punjab, who enjoys political patronage from across the political spectrum, is under the scanner for his possible role in the murders, they ...
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The Independent Influential Sikh youth group associating with far-right EDL founder Tommy RobinsonThe IndependentAn influential Sikh youth group has been accused of associating with far-right English Defence League founder Tommy Robinson and alleged...
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Sikhism FAQs
Sikhism FAQs:What do you know of Guru Tegh Bahadur?
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Guru Sakhis
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GURU NANAK in JAGANATH PURI The temple of Jagan Nath, was one of the four most revered temples of the Hindus. It is said that Jagan Nath's idol was sculptured by the architect of the gods and it was installed at the temple by Lord Brahma himself. It... Read More...
WorldGurudwaras.com
Worldgurudwaras.com will strive to be most comprehensive directory of Historical Gurudwaras and Non Historical Gurudwaras around the world. The etymology of the term 'gurdwara' is from the words 'Gur (ਗੁਰ)' (a reference to the Sikh Gurus) and 'Dwara (ਦੁਆਰਾ)' (gateway in Gurmukhi), together meaning 'the gateway through which the Guru could be reached'. Thereafter, all Sikh places of worship came to be known as gurdwaras.
SearchGurbani.com
SearchGurbani.com brings to you a unique and comprehensive approach to explore and experience the word of God. It has the Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji, Amrit Kirtan Gutka, Bhai Gurdaas Vaaran, Sri Dasam Granth Sahib and Kabit Bhai Gurdas . You can explore these scriptures page by page, by chapter index or search for a keyword. The Reference section includes Mahankosh, Guru Granth Kosh,and exegesis like Faridkot Teeka, Guru Granth Darpan and lot more.
TheSikhEncyclopedia.com
Encyclopedias encapsulate accurate information in a given area of knowledge and have indispensable in an age which the volume and rapidity of social change are making inaccessible much that outside one's immediate domain of concentration.At the time when Sikhism is attracting world wide notice, an online reference work embracing all essential facets of this vibrant faithis a singular contribution to the world of knowledge.
TheSikhEncyclopedia.com