Monday, October 24, 2016
Gateway to Sikhism


Raja Bhim Chand was received in Guru's darbar (court) with great honor. He prayed to the Guru to let him see the gifts from the Raja of Assam. He was shown all the presents. Bhim Chand was astonished at the magnificence of the Kabuli tent. He was told that it was the offering of a pious Sikh from Kabul. During this conversation when the beautifully decorated elephant was let forward, Bhim Chand stood spellbound and expressed his unbounded admiration of all that he had seen. On his homeward journey his mind burned with jealousy of the Guru's state and wealth and he made up his mind to take possession of at least the elephant.

Guru Ji had 52 poets in his Durbar, and regularly the Guru held poetical symposiums and listened to his poets, and rewarded them generously.

On his return to the capital, Bhim Chand disclosed his designs to his courtiers . It was decided that a messageshould be sent to the Guru that Raja Fateh Chand of Garhwal's party was coming with the object of Betrothing his daughter to Bhim Chand's son, and Bhim Chand desired to borrow the elephant so as to makea display of his wealth to his guests. When the message was delivered to the Guru, he knew that it was only a trick to obtain permanent possession of the animal. He sent the reply to Bhim Chand," The Raja who presented the elephant, requested me not to let the animal go out of my possession. It is the principle of Guru's house to comply with such requests." It is said that the Raja sent his emissaries thrice, the last one being Kesari Chand, the Raja of Jaswal, but the Guru did not yield and therefore, Bhim Chand's demand was not met. So he got angry and wanted to take revenge.

Majority of the ma sands felt agitated at the Guru's warlike preparations and they represented to his motherto dissuade him from such activities lest it should bring some trouble to him. When his mother talked to him about it, he replied," Dear mother, I have been sent by the Immortal God. He who worshippeth Him shall be happy; but he who acteth dishonestly and worshippeth stones shall receive well-merited retribution. This is my commission from God. If today I give Raja Bhim Chand the elephant, I shall have to pay him tribute tomorrow." Nand Chand then joined the conversation and said," Mother, hath a lion ever feared jackals? Hath any one ever seen the light of the firefly in bright sunshine? What availeth a drop of water in comparison with the ocean? The Guru is a tiger brave and splendid as the sun. Shall he fear Bhim Chand?" The Master ended the discussion by saying,"Dear mother, heed not the evil advice of the masands. They have become cowards by eating the offerings of the Sikhs." The Guru and his troops continued to practise archery and devoted themselves to the chase. The Sikhs kept visiting continually and make offering of arms. Those who came for military service, were readily received and were taught the profession of arms. In this way the Guru collected a considerable army.



The pens of Guru Gobind Singh Ji with which he used to write at Paonta Sahib. Probably these were used to write the great epicDasam Granth.

In the meantime the Raja Medani Parkash of Nahan, invited the Guru to visit him. The invitation was accepted and he left for Nahan. Gulab Rai and Sham Das were made incharge for the defence of Anandpur. The Raja came to greet and welcome the Guru and then took him to his palace. One day the Raja took him on hunting excursion and complained that Raja Fateh Shah of Garhwal had often quarrelled with him over the ground on which they were then standing. He suggested that he would be very pleased if a fort were to be constructed on the spot for protection against the enemy. The Guru erected a tent on that spot and held a darbar. He laid down foundation stone of the fort. With the help of the Raja's army and with the zeal and energy of the workmen, the fort was completed within a short time. The Guru named it Paunta, and started to live there and continued to increase his army.

Raja F ateh Shah of Garhwal arrived at the conclusion that since the Guru started living near his territory, itwould, therefore, be politic to be on good terms with him and accordingly he decided to pay a visit to the Guru. He was received with great honor in the Guru's darbar (court). During his visit the Guru sent his uncle Kirpal to him to suggest that it would be well if he and the Raja of Nahan were on good terms. Raja Fateh Shah gave his consent immediately. The Guru then sent for the Raja of Nahan. He brought the two Rajas together in the open court, caused them to embrace and form a friendship.

In the meantime a hillman came with tidings of a fierce tiger which was destroying cattle in the neighborhood. He requested the Guru to free the country from the wild animal. He took the two Rajas and others to the place where the tiger was said to be residing. On hearing the huntsmen's foot steps, the tiger sat on his haunches looking at his pursuers. The Guru called on any one who could engage the tiger with sword and shield. No one came forward. He then took his sword and shield and challenged the tiger. The tiger rose with a roar and sprang at the Guru, who received him on his shield and striking him on the flank with his sword, cut him in two. The Rajas and the hunting party were astonished and delighted at his strength and bravery.



Guru Gobind Singh Ji - a connosieur of music and a prolific singer, wanted even handicapped to overcome their disabilities. He even taught several of blind disciples the art of music and made them expert at instruments, such as Tabla, Rabab, Saranda and Taus. The Guru bestowed his blessings on handicapped without discrimination.

Ram Rai, the eldest son of Guru Har Rai, when sent to Delhi on behalf of the Guru, distorted the holy words of Guru Nanak in the court of Aurangzeb in order to please the Emperor. Upon this the Guru disowned him and communicated him from the Sikh faith. The Emperor gave him an estate where he founded the town of Dehra Dun and continued to live there. Ram Rai claimed himself as the real Guru. Being a willing tool in the hands of the Mughal Emperor, he continually tried to harm the cause of the Sikhs. Now since Guru Gobind Singh had come to Paunta, which was only thirty miles from Dehra Dun, Ram Rai became afraid of him and could not muster courage to face him. A discussion started in Ram Rai's assembly about all this. Hearing on Ram Rai's anxiety, the Guru sent Nand Chand and Daya Ram to reassure him that no harm would be done to him. Ram Rai on receiving the Guru's message, was very much delighted. He gave robes of honor to Nand Chand and Daya Ram and decided to be on friendly terms with the Guru.

It is said that a meeting between the Guru and Ram Rai took place in a ferry in the middle of the stream. Ram Rai touched the Guru's feet in obeisance and said," I am fortunate to have obtained a sight of thee. When I am gone, protect my familymy father Guru Har Rai used to say that someone would be born from our family who would restore and refit the vessel for the safe conveyance of the souls." He asked for forgiveness. Ram Rai while he was in trance, was cremated by his masands in defiance of the entreaties and prayers of his wife, Punjab Kaur. The Guru then responded to the request of Punjab Kaur and meted out strict punishment to the guilty masands and rewarded those who had remained faithful to her.



Pir Budhu Shah was a Muslim saint who lived at Sadhaura, about ten or fifteen miles from Paunta Sahib. He was well known for his piety and had a large number of followers. He had heard of Guru Nanak and his mission. He had also learned that Guru Nanak's throne was then occupied by Guru Gobind Singh who was staying in the neighborhood. Ultimately he decided to visit him. The Guru seated the Pir near him who beseeched," Pray! tell us how one meets God Almighty." During the discussion the Pir humbly submitted to the Master. There was a glow in the eyes of the Guru which radiated Divine Light and the Pir exclaimed with sudden joy," Allah-hu- Akbar!" - Great is God Almighty. After a while the Pir confessed," Master, I was spiritually blind and you have shown me the Light." Blessed are the souls on whom the Guru bestows the divine grace.

Next will strive to be most comprehensive directory of Historical Gurudwaras and Non Historical Gurudwaras around the world.

The etymology of the term 'gurdwara' is from the words 'Gur (ਗੁਰ)' (a reference to the Sikh Gurus) and 'Dwara (ਦੁਆਰਾ)' (gateway in Gurmukhi), together meaning 'the gateway through which the Guru could be reached'. Thereafter, all Sikh places of worship came to be known as gurdwaras. brings to you a unique and comprehensive approach to explore and experience the word of God. It has the Sri Guru Granth Sahib Ji, Amrit Kirtan Gutka, Bhai Gurdaas Vaaran, Sri Dasam Granth Sahib and Kabit Bhai Gurdas . You can explore these scriptures page by page, by chapter index or search for a keyword. The Reference section includes Mahankosh, Guru Granth Kosh,and exegesis like Faridkot Teeka, Guru Granth Darpan and lot more.
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